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Civis Data Science | 7.22.20

COVID-19 Impact Research


Consumer Insights
Team Civis

With funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Civis Analytics is conducting ongoing research to study the social, economic and educational impacts of COVID-19 in America. Research is conducted at a national level as well as deep dives in Florida, Texas, Washington, Ohio and New York.

Survey Fielded July 17-20, 2020

 

National Highlights

Attitudes toward Student Data

Of parents of K-12 students in the US, 53.9% say that they know how their children’s school or teachers are using the data collected about their students. 53.8% of parents say that they understand more about the data collected about their children since school closures earlier this year, and 36.5% say they feel more comfortable than before with the data collected about their children since school closures and starting educational activities at home earlier this year.

In terms of what data parents have received from schools or teachers, 51.7% were provided grades on report cards, followed by 39.7% who see attendance and/or class participation, and 31.5% who see a qualitative student profile of strengths and skills. 6.3% report not receiving data about their children’s progress and performance over the last school year.

What kind of data did your children’s school or teachers provide you on your child’s progress and performance during this past school year? Please select all that apply.

US Margin of Error = 2.6%

State Order Reaction

52.5% of parents of K-12 students think that their children’s school or teachers have used collected data to help their students’ academic progress after school closures, about the same as 53.0% prior to school closures. 47.5% of US parents of K-12 students say they themselves have used collected data to help their students’ academic progress after school closures, about the same as 46.3% prior to school closures. 

44.6% of US parents are interested in seeing their children’s school collect more data about their children’s progress and performance in the next school year, whereas 7.5% would like to see less data collected. 46.4% want schools and teachers to share more data with parents in the next school year, and 47.5% would like to see the same amount of data in the next school year.

The majority of parents (84.6%) strongly or somewhat agree that they support the use of data (such as grades, attendance, and test scores) to make sure that their students are getting the support and enrichment that they need. 83.3% of parents strongly or somewhat agree that they need data to understand their children’s progress in order to help their children do their best. 67.8% of parents strongly or somewhat agree that their children’s school actively communicates how they’re using the data that it collects on their children.

Attitudes toward Coronavirus

Across the US, a majority of people (61.7%) are more concerned about coronavirus in response to news about increasing cases in some states (e.g. Arizona, Florida, Texas, California). 54.8% of US respondents believe that people living in those states not following guidelines on social distancing and mask wearing is one of the most important factors contributing toward some states experiencing a surge in COVID-19 cases, followed by 50.7% believing state governments reopening too quickly is one of the most important factors, and 38.3% believing that the federal government has not set appropriate guidelines for states to follow.

Overall, 46.6% of the US is very concerned about coronavirus, which is slightly higher compared to late June when 43.1% of the US reported being very concerned. Of the specific effects of COVID-19, respondents are most concerned about transmitting the virus to others (38.3% very concerned), followed by the long term health impacts of COVID-19 (36.8% very concerned).

How concerned are you about Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

US Margin of Error = 1.4%

Attitudes Concern Level in US

In the news, the most common topic that US respondents have read or heard about is coronavirus, with 53.7% of reporting they’ve heard a lot about it. After slowly dropping from a high of 66.9% in early April to 53.7% in early June, the consumption of coronavirus related news has remained about level since early June. The next most common topic is racial justice demonstrations and protests, with 42.4% reporting they’ve heard a lot about this topic. This is down significantly from late June, when 52.0% of respondents reported reading or hearing a lot about this topic.

Protective Measures Highlights

Mask usage continued to increase this wave, with 72.2% of respondents reporting always wearing one in public, compared to 65.8% in late June and 61.1% in early June. The adoption of all other protective measures was about consistent since last wave, with 67.9% always washing hands frequently for at least 20 seconds (compared to 69.6% in late June), 64.6% always staying 6 ft apart from others (compared to 64.1% in late June), and 58.1% staying home and limiting trips to only essentials (compared to 57.9% in late June).

How often do you wear a cloth face covering or mask while in public?

US Margin of Error = 1.4%

Frequency of Face Mask in US

 

Of respondents who report rarely or never wearing a face mask, the most common reason for not doing so is that it’s uncomfortable (35.5% overall).

A majority (63.7%) of the US has heard about contact tracing as a way of helping slow the spread of COVID-19. The most compelling reason to take part in such a program is that contact tracing helps slow the spread of COVID-19, with 45.6% of US respondents citing this reason. The next most compelling reasons are that contact tracing finds and isolates new infections before they spread (39.3% selected) and that information from contact tracing is strictly confidential and used only to slow the spread of the virus (35.1% selected).

 

Methodology

Responses were gathered through online web panels and weighted to accurately reflect the entire adult U.S. population. Questions were fielded July 17-20, 2020 (7,800 respondents).

 

Download Quick Takes From Prior Waves

Deep dive analysis is available at a national level and starting in Wave 4, for certain states.

July 17-20, 2020:       National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 25-28, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 09-14, 2020:      National | New York | Washington | Ohio

May 22-26, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

May 08-10, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas

April 23-26, 2020:     National | Florida | New York | Washington

April 17-19, 2020:     National

April 10-12, 2020:     National

April 02-04, 2020:     National

 

Click Here to View and Download All Toplines From Prior Waves >> 

 

This data has been shared with the Understanding Coronavirus in America Study led by the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research.