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Civis Data Science | 5.12.21

COVID-19 Impact Research


Consumer Insights
Team Civis

With funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Civis Analytics is conducting ongoing research to study the social, economic and educational impacts of COVID-19 in America. Research is conducted at a national level as well as deep dives in Florida, Texas, Washington, Ohio and New York.

Civis Analytics fielded a survey with 8,572 US respondents on May 6-10, 2021. Below are some key takeaways from this wave’s research.

National Highlights 

COVID-19 Vaccine

Nationally, 55.2% of adults report that they have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, a 27pp increase since our last wave of research in March (28.2%). 77.8% of vaccinated US adults report having received a second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Of those who have only received one dose, 65.8% report they have a second dose scheduled and plan to receive it, and 25.1% report they received the single-dose Johnson and Johnson vaccine.

Vaccine Received Post Approval by Age

Have you received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine?
Vaccination rates have increased dramatically across age groups, with more recent gains made by adults under the age of 65. In our current wave of research, 61.9% of 50-64 year olds, 50.8% of 35-49 year olds, and 37.6% of 18-34 year olds report receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Among US adults who have been vaccinated, 24.4% report that they felt hesitant about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. The most common motivators to get the vaccine among those who identified as hesitant are they knew that it was part of helping end the pandemic (33.8%), they knew it would help protect them from getting COVID-19 (31.7%), and that the vaccine was recommended by their local health department (30.6%). Among US adults who have not yet been vaccinated, 38.5% of US adults say they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat likely’ to get vaccinated for COVID-19, while 37.1% say they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat unlikely’, and 13.6% are not sure.

The top reason for not yet receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, among US adults who are aware they are eligible but haven’t yet received it, is they do not intend to be vaccinated for COVID-19 (46.6%). Among US adults who indicate being unsure about or unlikely to get the vaccine, the most common reasons they report are that they don’t trust that the vaccine will really be safe (47.5%) and that they’re worried the vaccine will have side effects (43.0%).

Of those who indicate they are unsure about or unlikely to get the coronavirus vaccine, 15.3% indicate knowing someone who has experienced side effects as a reason why they are unlikely to get the vaccine. 81.9% of US adults have a family member or friend who has received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, and of that group 38.9% report that their family member or friend experienced adverse side effects.

Levels of concern about the COVID-19 vaccine differ across different manufacturers. Of US adults who indicate they are unsure about or unlikely to get the coronavirus vaccine, 13.9% report concern about a certain vaccine that has been approved. In particular, when asked how likely they would be to receive a vaccine from a certain manufacturer (or if vaccinated, recommend a certain vaccine to a family member), 44.3% of US adults report being ‘very likely’ to recommend Pfizer, 39.2% for Moderna, 20.2% for Johnson and Johnson, and 16.8% for AstraZeneca.

You noted that you were hesitant to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. What motivated you to receive the COVID-19 vaccine? Please select up to three reasons.
US Margin of Error = 3.8%
What motivated you to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?
COVID-19 Vaccine Plans for Children

Among US adults who identify as parents or guardians of children 18 years old or younger, plans for vaccinating children differ across age groups. Everyone over the age of 16 in all 50 states is eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine, and since fielding this survey the vaccine has also been approved for 12 to 15 year olds. Among US parents, 42.0% of those with children 0 to 6 months old report being ‘very’ or ‘somewhat likely’ to get those child(ren) vaccinated when it is available, compared to 53.6% of US parents when asked about their 6 months to 11 years old child(ren) and 61.2% for parents with 12 to 15 year old child(ren). 46.6% of US parents with 16 to 18 year olds report that those child(ren) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Of US parents with 16 to 18 year olds who haven’t received the vaccine yet, 35.5% say they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat likely’ to get their child(ren) in that age group vaccinated.

Economic Impact

Nationally, 36.6% of US adults are more worried about being able to pay their rent or mortgage relative to the start of the pandemic, 46.7% are more worried about covering unexpected expenses, and 37.0% say their income has decreased. Compared to our last wave of research in March, levels of reported concern on these topics have largely stayed the same.
As vaccination rates climb and reopening continues, concerns about job loss are down from May 2020. 23.6% of employed US adults believe they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat likely’ to lose their job because of the pandemic within the next three months, compared to 34.4% last May. Since the start of the pandemic, 32.4% of US adults report that their savings have stayed the same, 27.4% report that they’ve decreased, and 12.1% report not having savings both before COVID-19 and currently.

Likelihood Jobloss in US

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) may cause economic challenges for some people regardless of whether they are actually infected. How likely do you think it is that you will lose your job because of the Coronavirus within the next three months?
Concerns about losing employment among US adults have decreased over the course of the pandemic.

COVID-19 Protective Measures

The CDC has issued new guidelines around mask wearing and social distancing in light of the state of vaccinations. Compared to our last wave in March, compliance with COVID-19 protective measures nationally has decreased. 70.4% of US adults report always wearing a mask indoors, compared to 51.8% outdoors, and 49.8% report always staying 6 feet apart from others while indoors, compared to 49.1% outdoors. In the US, 42.6% of adults report always staying home and limiting trips to essentials, and 48.5% report only gathering in small groups when socializing.

Of US adults who report ‘sometimes,’ ‘rarely’, or ‘never’ wearing a mask indoors, 22.5% say they don’t do so because they have received the COVID-19 vaccine. Of those who report not always staying 6 feet apart while indoors, 32.5% say they don’t distance properly because they have received the COVID-19 vaccine.

How often do you do each of the following?
US Margin of Error = 1.5%How often do you do each of the following?

COVID-19 Information

Overall, 29.7% of US adults say that they are ‘very concerned’ about Coronavirus (COVID-19), down from 34.1% from our last wave of research in March. The most common sources of information on the coronavirus that US adults report ‘strongly’ trusting are their physician (51.7%), federal public health officials (34.3%), the World Health Organization (32.7%) and local public health officials (31.0%).

With regard to the global state of the pandemic, 39.2% of US adults say they are ‘very concerned’ about the current situation in other countries. 67.8% of US adults report having heard of the COVID-19 crisis in India. Adults in the US support vaccine sharing, with 68.6% ‘strongly’ or ‘somewhat’ agreeing that the United States should be sharing its vaccines with other countries and 70.2% ‘strongly’ or ‘somewhat’ agreeing that all countries should be sharing their vaccines with others.

How concerned are you about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in other countries?
US Margin of Error = 1.5%How concerned are you about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in other countries?

Methodology

Responses were gathered through online web panels, quality screened, and weighted to accurately reflect the entire adult population of National. Questions were fielded May 6-10, 2021 (8,572 respondents).

 

Download Quick Takes From Prior Waves 

Deep dive analysis is available at a national level and starting in Wave 4, for certain states.

May 6-10, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Mar. 11-15, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Feb. 11-15, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Jan. 14-19, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Dec. 9-14, 2020:          National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Oct. 21-26, 2020:       National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Sept. 17-21, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

August 20-23, 2020:  National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

July 17-20, 2020:       National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 25-28, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 09-14, 2020:      National | New York | Washington | Ohio

May 22-26, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

May 08-10, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas

April 23-26, 2020:     National | Florida | New York | Washington

April 17-19, 2020:     National

April 10-12, 2020:     National

April 02-04, 2020:     National

 

Click Here to View and Download All Toplines From Prior Waves >> 

 

This data has been shared with the Understanding Coronavirus in America Study led by the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research.