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Civis Data Science | 2.18.21

COVID-19 Impact Research


Consumer Insights
Team Civis

With funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Civis Analytics is conducting ongoing research to study the social, economic and educational impacts of COVID-19 in America. Research is conducted at a national level as well as deep dives in Florida, Texas, Washington, Ohio and New York.

 

National Highlights from February 11-15, 2021 Survey 

COVID-19 Vaccine

In the US, 16.8% of adults report that they have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far. Of those who have not yet been vaccinated, 61.6% of US adults say they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ likely to get vaccinated for COVID-19, while 29.8% say they are ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ unlikely, and 8.5% are not sure. Of those who are unlikely or unsure whether they will get vaccinated, 45.2% said it is because they don’t trust that the vaccine will really be safe, 44.6% said they are worried the vaccine will have side effects, 36.1% said they don’t trust that the vaccine will really be effective. 44.0% of US adults say they would be more likely to get the COVID-19 vaccine if they knew it would help protect them from getting COVID-19, 36.9% said they would be more likely to get the vaccine if they knew that it was part of helping end the pandemic, and 26.7% said they would be more likely to get the vaccine if it has been out for a few months and seems okay.

With regard to eligibility, 41.3% of US adults report being eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine under their state’s current vaccination rollout phase, 33.2% report being ineligible, and 25.5% say they are unsure. When asked why they have not yet received a dose, eligible adults in the US say they have not been able to secure an appointment or their appointment was cancelled (22.9%), vaccine supply is limited and others who are eligible need it more than they do (21.9%), or they do not intend to be vaccinated for COVID-19 (21.9%).

 

You indicated that you are currently eligible for a vaccine in your state, but you have not yet received a dose. Which of the following statements best reflects why?
US Margin of Error = 2.9%

 

Government Priorities

When asked about government budget priorities, 56.4% of US adults said they would increase federal spending for health care, 53.0% would increase federal spending for Coronavirus (COVID-19), and 52.4% would increase federal spending for assistance to the needy in the U.S. For state budgets, 61.2% of US adults said they would increase spending for health care, 57.1% would increase spending for Coronavirus (COVID-19), and 45.4% would increase spending for K-12 education. Compared to stated priorities in January, these levels of support have remained constant, other than the ascendance of assistance to the needy as a top priority.

43.6% of US adults said that they would increase spending for K-12 education in the federal government budget, and 26.7% of US adults said they would increase spending for postsecondary education in the federal budget. Similarly, 45.4% of US adults said they would increase spending for K-12 education in their state’s government budget, and 30.0% of US adults said they would increase spending for postsecondary education in the state budget.

Parenting 

When asked who is responsible for taking care of their child(ren), 56.5% of US adults say they share the care of their child(ren) with a partner, ex-partner, or relative, while 17.6% say they are a single parent. Single parents in the US say they are most concerned about paying bills and managing household finances (42.6%), working to support their family (30.1%), and grocery shopping and food security (30.0%). When it comes to seeking outside support, single parents say they are actively looking for support or outside intervention for paying bills and managing household finances (31.0%), grocery shopping and food security (28.7%) and the mental health and stability of their family (25.2%).

As for households where multiple adults share childcare responsibilities, there has not been a shift in division of roles in the home since the start of COVID-19. Before COVID-19, parents with another adult in the household report equally sharing the following household responsibilities: making health decisions for the family (62.0%), playing with/entertaining children (51.7%) and caring for children (50.0%). Since the start of COVID-19, parents’ shared responsibilities have largely remained the same; parents say they equally share making health decisions for the family (63.5%), playing with/entertaining children (50.6%), and working to support the family (50.3%).

School Reopenings

25.2% of parents of K-12 students report that their children are attending all in-person classes, 50.1% report that their children are attending all remote classes, and 24.7% report a hybrid of in-person and remote. Of the parents who report their children are attending all remote or hybrid classes, 49.6% say there is at least one student in their child’s class who is having trouble accessing online resources.

44.8% of parents of K-12 students who are attending all remote or hybrid classes say that the school or teachers typically plan educational activities, while 35.0% say they typically do it themselves, and 10.6% say another parent or guardian does. 58.6% of parents of K-12 students who are attending all remote or hybrid classes ‘agree’ or ‘strongly agree’ that school closures have made it difficult for them to work or do other household tasks.

As for K-12 schools providing information to families, 55.4% of US K-12 parents say their children’s school has provided information on mental health, 63.0% on physical health, 41.0% on racial justice, and 68.1% on food services. The reported availability of these resources has remained stable since August 2020 (mental and physical health jointly at 54.8%, racial justice at 39.1%, and food services at 63.9%).

 

Has your children’s school provided information on any of the following topics?
US Margin of Error = 3%

 

COVID-19 Protective Measures

81.0% of US adults report ‘always’ wearing a cloth face covering or face mask while in public, 56.1% ‘always’ staying home and limited trips to only essentials, 64.4% ‘always’ staying 6 feet apart from others, 55.5% ‘always’ gathering with small groups only when socializing, and 55.7% ‘always’ gathering with small groups only when socializing, continuing to wear masks and remain six feet apart during group activities.

Compliance with protective measures over time

Mask wearing frequency has steadily increased in the US since the summer of 2020, with the vast majority of US adults always wearing a cloth face covering or face mask while in public.

Of those who report only ‘sometimes,’ ‘rarely’, or ‘never’ wear a face mask, 30.0% say they don’t do so because if they’re social distancing and/or outside, it’s not necessary, followed by 24.5% who say they don’t do so because it’s uncomfortable, and 20.4% who say they don’t do so because they don’t really trust the people who are telling us it is necessary to wear a mask. Of those who report not always staying 6 feet apart from others, 46.1% say they don’t do so because some of the places they go don’t have enough room to stay 6 feet apart, followed by 30.8% who say they don’t do so because when they try to stay socially distanced, others don’t, and 27.9% who say they don’t do so because if they’re outside and/or wearing a mask, it’s not necessary to stay physically distanced. Of those who report not always gathering with small groups only when socializing, 36.3% say they don’t do so because they trust that their friends and family have taken proper precautions, followed by 25.6% who say they don’t do so because if they are wearing masks, standing six feet apart and/or are outside, it’s not necessary to gather in small groups, and 22.8% who say they don’t do so because gatherings are spontaneous, so it’s not easy to control the number of people.

When asked what would make them more likely to follow recommended COVID-19 behaviors, 63.0% of US adults selected if they believed it would help to end the pandemic as soon as possible, 42.1% of US adults selected if they believed it was a way to protect the most vulnerable in their community, and 31.5% of US adults selected if they believed it would mean they were not responsible for getting someone else sick.

 

Attitudes toward Coronavirus

How concerned are you about Coronavirus (COVID-19)?
US Margin of Error = 1.5% 

Overall, 39.7% of US adults say that they are ‘Very concerned’ about Coronavirus (COVID-19), down from 43.3% from our last wave of research in January. Concern about Coronavirus has been trending downward since a peak in December 2020 and is at its lowest levels since early summer of 2020.

24.8% of US adults believe that all or most of the information available about COVID-19 is trustworthy, while 30.8% believe there is misinformation and it’s hard to know what’s real, 25.7% believe there is some misinformation but it’s easy to know what’s fake, and 18.6% say they can’t trust all or most of the information available about COVID-19.

 

Thinking about the information you learn about COVID-19 and the pandemic, which of the following most closely describes how you feel?
US Margin of Error = 1.5%


Methodology

Responses were gathered through online web panels, quality screened, and weighted to accurately reflect the entire adult population of the US. Questions were fielded February 11-15, 2021 (7,916 respondents).

 

Download Quick Takes From Prior Waves 

Deep dive analysis is available at a national level and starting in Wave 4, for certain states.

Feb. 11-15, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Jan. 14-19, 2021:        National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Dec. 9-14, 2020:          National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Oct. 21-26, 2020:       National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

Sept. 17-21, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

August 20-23, 2020:  National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

July 17-20, 2020:       National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 25-28, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

June 09-14, 2020:      National | New York | Washington | Ohio

May 22-26, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas | Ohio

May 08-10, 2020:      National | Florida | New York | Washington | Texas

April 23-26, 2020:     National | Florida | New York | Washington

April 17-19, 2020:     National

April 10-12, 2020:     National

April 02-04, 2020:     National

 

Click Here to View and Download All Toplines From Prior Waves >> 

 

This data has been shared with the Understanding Coronavirus in America Study led by the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research.